Chabad Lubavitch of Northern VirginiaEmail: rabbideitsch@aol.comPhone: 703-426-1980www.ChabadVA.org
  B"H
Spend Shabbat in Crown Heights!

 

Highlight
  • A visit to 770, the Rebbe’s house, and the Ohel
  • A tour of the Crown Heights neighborhood
  • Uplifting chassidic gatherings
  • Insightful talks, group learning and discussions
  • Meet inspiring personalities
  • Gourmet kosher cuisine 
Cost: $240 per person Register Today ShabbatinTheHeights.com

Message from the Rabbi
 

A small-town policeman stops a motorist for speeding. Peering into the back seat, he sees a large collection of knives, machetes, and swords. The policeman places a cautious hand on his firearm and asks the man to step out of the car. When queried about the contents of the back seat, the driver explains, "Oh, those! Officer, I'm a juggler and those are part of my act."

Skeptical, the policeman calls the man's bluff. "If you can juggle them like you say, I'll let you off," he offers. And sure enough, driver's hands explode into a dizzying frenzy of spinning, twirling, flying blades, reflecting brilliantly in the afternoon sun.

As this occurs, a passing driver says to his wife, "Martha, it's a good thing I gave up drinking... look at the sobriety test they're giving these days!"


In order to be kosher, meat must come from an animal which chews its cud and has split hooves.

What is the significance of these requirements?

The Ten Commandments were engraved upon two tablets—five commandments on each. The commandments on the first tablet focused primarily on self-perfection and observance—i.e., one's personal relationship with G‑d. The second group of commandments focused on ethics and interactions—i.e., one's relationship with others.

A good, balanced Jew is one who excels in both areas. Both the dishonest, Torah-observant person and the generous, non-Torah-observant person fall short of G‑d’s expectations. Perfection is achieved only with meticulous fulfillment of both.

This spiritual balancing act is embodied by the kosher signs discussed in this week’s Torah portion. The animal’s first kosher sign, chewing its cud, represents the importance of self- perfection, whereas the second sign, having split hooves, reminds us of our obligations to our peers.

The ruminant animal, constantly chewing its cud, represents the person who persistently works on his or her inner self, perfecting every aspect over and over again. The spilt hooves (as opposed to closed hooves) represent the person who has mastered open, giving relationships with his or her peers.

Adhering to the kosher laws provides a constant reminder of what it takes to be a good person. We need to be kosher both on the inside and outside—“In the eyes of G‑d and in that of man”—a true juggling act.

 
New JLI Course — What Is? Rethinking Everything we Know About Our Universe  
 

 

What Is? Rethinking Everything we Know About Our Universe

Imagine that you were able to rethink everything you knew about the universe, the laws of nature, your own consciousness, and the very idea of existence and reality. Imagine the new insights you will gain, the fresh perspective with which you will embark on the journey of life each morning.

What is? does exactly that. Drawing on the wisdom of Chassidic teaching, the most basic building blocks of existence are reexamined from the bottom up, revolutionizing our understanding of life, reality, and our place in the world.

  • Is the World Real?
  • Is Time Travel Possible?
  • Why does evil exist?
  • Who is G‑d?
  • What is consciousness?
  • Are we bound by fate?

More InformationRegister

6 Mondays beginning Apr 23rd 2018 - 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm

 

Lag B'Omer Coming Up!  
 

May 3, 2018

Counting the Omer!  
 

Sefirat HaOmer
Counting of the Omer
Between the holidays of Passover and Shavuot, the Omer is counted each evening, signifying our preparation for the receiving of the Torah on the holiday of Shavuot. Your one-stop site for an enhanced Omer experience. 

 

Torah Discussion - Thursday Nights - Resumes This Week  
 

Thursday Nights - 8:00 pm

An inspirational weekly discussion on the Torah portion including both captivating insights into the parsha, and practical advice, led by Rabbi Deitsch

Upcoming Service Times  
 

 

This shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim, the shabbos before the new month. Please join us at 9am in our custom to say the book of Tehillim (Psalms)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
 
 
Shabbat Times
Candle Lighting Times for
Fairfax, VA [Based on Zip Code 22031]:
Shabbat Candle Lighting:
Friday, Apr 13
7:26 pm
Shabbat Ends:
Shabbat, Apr 14
8:26 pm
Torah Portion: Shemini
 
 
Kiddush

As of this writing, we do not have a sponsor for this week's kiddush.

Consider marking an occasion!  Go online here, or call the office!

What's Happening?
Upcoming Events
Weekly Parsha Discussion
Apr. 12, 2018 - 8:00 pm
Join us for an insightful torah discussion relating the parsha of the week to our daily lives— led by Rabbi Deitsch
Weekly Parsha Discussion
Apr. 19, 2018 - 8:00 pm
Join us for an insightful torah discussion relating the parsha of the week to our daily lives— led by Rabbi Deitsch
JLI: What Is? Rethinking Everything we Know About Universe
Apr. 23, 2018 - 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Imagine that you were able to rethink everything you knew about the universe, the laws of nature, your own consciousness, and the very idea of existence and reality. Imagine the new insights you will gain, the fresh perspective with which you will embark on the journey of life each morning.

What is? does exactly that. Drawing on the wisdom of Chassidic teaching, the most basic building blocks of existence are reexamined from the bottom up, revolutionizing our understanding of life, reality, and our place in the world.

More Info »
Weekly Parsha Discussion
Apr. 26, 2018 - 8:00 pm
Join us for an insightful torah discussion relating the parsha of the week to our daily lives— led by Rabbi Deitsch
JLI: What Is? Rethinking Everything we Know About Universe
Apr. 30, 2018 - 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Imagine that you were able to rethink everything you knew about the universe, the laws of nature, your own consciousness, and the very idea of existence and reality. Imagine the new insights you will gain, the fresh perspective with which you will embark on the journey of life each morning.

What is? does exactly that. Drawing on the wisdom of Chassidic teaching, the most basic building blocks of existence are reexamined from the bottom up, revolutionizing our understanding of life, reality, and our place in the world.

More Info »
JLI: What Is? Rethinking Everything we Know About Universe
May. 7, 2018 - 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Imagine that you were able to rethink everything you knew about the universe, the laws of nature, your own consciousness, and the very idea of existence and reality. Imagine the new insights you will gain, the fresh perspective with which you will embark on the journey of life each morning.

What is? does exactly that. Drawing on the wisdom of Chassidic teaching, the most basic building blocks of existence are reexamined from the bottom up, revolutionizing our understanding of life, reality, and our place in the world.

More Info »
 
 
Daily Quote
The Torah could be given only to eaters of manna
— Midrash Mechilta, Beshalach 17
Daily Thought
Small Things

Great things are not what is demanded from our generation. The previous generations did all that for us. We need only do the small things—but in a more difficult time.

For us, self-sacrifice could mean nothing more than a simple change of habit for the good, or a quiet act of restraint to avoid the ugly.

In a maddening, rushed world, small battles make mighty victories. Try and you will see.

 
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This Week @ www.ChabadNoVa.org
Question
Why Is the Day After the Holiday Called Isru Chag?
The name is based on the verse in Psalms, “Bind [the] festival [offering] with cords to the corners of the altar.”
Parshah
What Not to Say at a Shiva Call
 
Women
A Little Prayer for You, My Husband
“Bring your husband to the hospital,” the doctor said after I told him Adam was having trouble walking because his feet were numb.
Video
The Ultimate Test of Faith
Something Spiritual on Parshat Shemini
Chabad-Lubavitch News from Around the World
Israel
Summer Birthright Trip Delivers Inspiration and Inclusion
 
Australia & New Zealand
A Kangaroo Crash and a Rare Rabbi Sighting in the Outback
 
Holiday Watch
Don't Forget to Count on the Omer App!
 
Holiday Watch
Pre-Passover Checklist: Sell Your ‘Chametz’
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
The Jewish Calendar
  Wednesday Nissan 26 | April 11
Omer: Day 11
Today in Jewish HistoryPassing of Joshua (1245 BCE)
Laws and CustomsCount "Twelve Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Thursday Nissan 27 | April 12
Omer: Day 12
Today in Jewish HistoryWarsaw Ghetto Uprising (1943)
Laws and CustomsCount "Thirteen Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Friday Nissan 28 | April 13
Omer: Day 13
Today in Jewish HistoryJericho's Wall Collapses (1273 BCE)
Today in Jewish HistoryBuchenwald Liberated (1945)
Today in Jewish HistoryRebbe's Call (1991)
Laws and CustomsCount "Fourteen Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Shabbat Nissan 29 | April 14
Omer: Day 14
Laws and CustomsBless New Month
Laws and CustomsEthics: Chapter 1
Laws and CustomsCount "Fifteen Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Sunday Nissan 30 | April 15
Rosh Chodesh
Omer: Day 15
Today in Jewish HistoryPassing of R. Chaim Vital (1620)
Laws and CustomsRosh Chodesh Observances
Laws and CustomsCount "Sixteen Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Monday Iyar 1 | April 16
Rosh Chodesh
Omer: Day 16
Today in Jewish HistoryConstruction of 2nd Temple (370 BCE)
Today in Jewish HistoryPassing of R. Menachem Mendel of Horodok (1788)
Laws and CustomsRosh Chodesh Observances
Laws and CustomsCount "Seventeen Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Tuesday Iyar 2 | April 17
Omer: Day 17
Today in Jewish HistoryMaharash Born (1834)
Laws and CustomsCount "Eighteen Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Wednesday Iyar 3 | April 18
Omer: Day 18
Today in Jewish HistoryAncona Boycott (1556)
Today in Jewish HistoryRabbi Chaim Hodakov (1993)
Laws and CustomsCount "Nineteen Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Thursday Iyar 4 | April 19
Omer: Day 19
Today in Jewish HistoryMaimonides Saved (1165)
Laws and CustomsCount "Twenty Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Friday Iyar 5 | April 20
Omer: Day 20
Today in Jewish HistoryState of Israel Proclaimed (1948)
Laws and CustomsPreparation for Shavuot Begins
Laws and CustomsCount "Twenty-One Days to the Omer" Tonight
  Shabbat Iyar 6 | April 21
Omer: Day 21
Today in Jewish HistoryAnti-Jewish Riots in Russia (1881)
Today in Jewish HistoryWar of Independence (1948)
Laws and CustomsEthics: Chapter 2
Laws and CustomsCount "Twenty-Two Days to the Omer" Tonight
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
 
The Parshah In A Nutshell

Parshat Shemini

On the eighth day, following the seven days of their inauguration, Aaron and his sons begin to officiate as kohanim (priests); a fire issues forth from G‑d to consume the offerings on the altar, and the divine presence comes to dwell in the Sanctuary.

Aaron’s two elder sons, Nadav and Avihu, offer a “strange fire before G‑d, which He commanded them not” and die before G‑d. Aaron is silent in face of his tragedy. Moses and Aaron subsequently disagree as to a point of law regarding the offerings, but Moses concedes to Aaron that Aaron is in the right.

G‑d commands the kosher laws, identifying the animal species permissible and forbidden for consumption. Land animals may be eaten only if they have split hooves and also chew their cud; fish must have fins and scales; a list of non-kosher birds is given, and a list of kosher insects (four types of locusts).

Also in Shemini are some of the laws of ritual purity, including the purifying power of the mikvah (a pool of water meeting specified qualifications) and the wellspring. Thus the people of Israel are enjoined to “ differentiate between the impure and the pure.”