Chabad Lubavitch of Northern VirginiaEmail: rabbideitsch@aol.comPhone: 703-426-1980www.ChabadNoVa.org
  B"H
Almost all Services and Events Are Canceled

Services:

  • Please do not attendservices, if you:
    • are over the age of 65; or
    • are immunocompromised; or
    • are showing any symptoms of being sick whatsoever
  • All weekday services are canceled.  If you need a minyan, contact Rabbi Deitsch (by phone or text, with as much notice as possible) and we will attempt to arrange one
  • Shabbos services
    • In light of the Governor's recommendations to limit the size of gatherings, and with the guidance of Dr. Benjamin Schwartz, (director of epidemiology and population health for Fairfax county), we are severely restricting attendance for Friday night and Saturday morning services.
    • The shul is presently set up with six feet between each chair, which allows for limited attendance.  If you desire to attend services, either Friday night or Saturday, you must RSVP to Rabbi Deitsch ahead of time by calling or by text, 703-338-9854
    • There will be no kiddush lunch
    • Michael Medina is offering   Shabbat-in-a-Box dinners (min. 4 guests).  If you need a meal, or even just want to support his business which is taking a major hit lately, go to:
      https://orders.thekosherkitchen.com/products/shabbat-in-a-box (he will offer free delivery to our Chabad, where you can pick up).

Classes:

  • We are working on moving our classes on-line.  We've made a start — see the information below.  More will be added as they become available.

 

Message from the Rabbi
 

No matter where we may live in this ever-shrinking world, everyone seems to be thinking about the coronavirus (COVID-19). The situation is ever-evolving, and as the days progress, the number of people impacted is increasing at an alarming rate.

It’s scary. So much seems uncertain. And although following the CDC guidelines for social distancing keeps us apart physically at a time when our instinct is to huddle together, we can still support each other virtually. Reach out to the people in your life who are also feeling afraid and alone, especially people with fewer support systems in place. If you are still able to go out safely, offer to run errands for those more vulnerable. With phones, email, Whatsapp, video chat, and the many other platforms we are fortunate to have access to, no one should feel alone or forgotten. Stay positive, take some time to browse some resources to help you through this period, and please reach out to us if there's any way we can support you.

May G‑d grant our world healing real soon, and especially the ultimate healing — the coming of Moshiach!

 
Classes! Learning Opportunities! — Coming On Line!  
 

We are going through a historic period in time.  The coronavirus is ravaging the planet. Markets are falling, governments are scrambling and people are panicking.

This period of darkness includes in it the potential for added light!

Many of us are stuck at home and perhaps have more time available for study than we have had in the past.  On that note, Chabad of Northern Virginia is entering into the world of on-line classes.  Watch this space for future announcements of classes.  In the meantime, our lineup is:

  • Tuesday, 8-9 pm, Weekly Torah discussion, Rabbi Mendel Deitsch.  See the next entry.
  • Tuesday/Wednesday, March 24/25 - 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm - the Prayer of Asher Yatzar, part 1 and part 2. Rabbi Sholom Simon.  Is there ever a more appropriate time for delve deeper into this prayer?  Two segments, 30 minutes each.  Click here (at 1pm, Tue/Wed) to join the class
  • Passover In Depth, 4 part series over the next two Mondays and Thursdays (March 23, 26, 30 and April 2).  More information to come
 
Special Online Passover Class - 4 Part Series  
 

Join us for this 4-part online course that will unpack the major Passover themes through the prism of festivals, mitzvot, and story.

The class will be on two Mondays and Thursdays:  March 23, 26, 30, and April 2

More information will be forthcoming on how to get connected.

 
Judaism 201 Goes Online: The Blessing of Asher Yatzar  
 

The Kuzari calls Asher Yatzar the most important of the 100 brochos we say per day.  The Shelah HaKodesh calls it the father of all brochos.  Really?  Why is there such a hullabaloo over a brocho that we say when we leave the bathroom?

What's it all about?  What can we learn from this brocho and its text?

Is there a better time than during a public health crisis to learn this prayer?

Join us on-line for two 30-minute sessions via Zoom (https://zoom.us/j/876365414), Tuesday and Wednesday, March 24 and 25, from 1:00-1:30 pm

 
Weekly *Virtual* Torah Discussion - Tuesday Nights  
 

Tuesday Nights - 8:00 pm

We are going through a historic period in time.  The coronavirus is ravaging the planet. Markets are falling, governments are scrambling and people are panicking.

This period of darkness includes in it the potential for added light!

Join our Virtual Parshah (weeklyTorah portion) class with Rabbi Mendel.

Tuesday nights, 8-9 PM.  Click HERE to join

 
Community Pesach Seders . . . . On hold  
 

Our Seders are on hold for now. Please check back to find out its status.

 
 
Upcoming Service Times  
 

See information above.

 
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
 
 
Shabbat Times
Candle Lighting Times for
Fairfax:
Shabbat Candle Lighting:
Friday, Mar. 20
7:04 pm
Shabbat Ends:
Shabbat, Mar. 21
8:02 pm
 
 
Kiddush

Kiddushes are canceled until further notice

Consider marking your occasion! Reserve either on-line or call the office!

What's Happening?
Upcoming Events
Passover Class (online)
Monday, Mar. 23, 2020 - 7:30 pm
Join us for this 4-part online course that will unpack the major Passover themes through the prism of festivals, mitzvot, and story.
Judaism 201: Asher Yatzar
Tuesday, Mar. 24, 2020 - 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Asher Yatza has been called the most important bracha that we do each day. Why is that so? Join us — online via Zoom — to learn more about this. And, hey, is there ever a more appropriate time for delve deeper into this blessing? Two segments, 30 minutes each https://zoom.us/j/876365414
Weekly Parsha Discussion
Tuesday, Mar. 24, 2020 - 8:00 pm
Online Class. Join us for an insightful torah discussion relating the parsha of the week to our daily lives— led by Rabbi Mendel Deitsch
More Info »
Judaism 201: Asher Yatzar
Wednesday, Mar. 25, 2020 - 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Asher Yatza has been called the most important bracha that we do each day. Why is that so? Join us — online via Zoom — to learn more about this. And, hey, is there ever a more appropriate time for delve deeper into this blessing? Two segments, 30 minutes each https://zoom.us/j/876365414
Passover Class (online)
Thursday, Mar. 26, 2020 - 7:30 pm
Join us for this 4-part online course that will unpack the major Passover themes through the prism of festivals, mitzvot, and story.
Passover Class (online)
Monday, Mar. 30, 2020 - 7:30 pm
Join us for this 4-part online course that will unpack the major Passover themes through the prism of festivals, mitzvot, and story.
Weekly Parsha Discussion
Tuesday, Mar. 31, 2020 - 8:00 pm
Online Class. Join us for an insightful torah discussion relating the parsha of the week to our daily lives— led by Rabbi Mendel Deitsch
More Info »
Passover Class (online)
Thursday, Apr. 2, 2020 - 7:30 pm
Join us for this 4-part online course that will unpack the major Passover themes through the prism of festivals, mitzvot, and story.
Pesach Seder
Wednesday, Apr. 8, 2020 - 7:15 pm
Relive the exodus, discover the eternal meaning of the Haggadah, and enjoy a community Seder complete with hand-baked Shmurah Matzah, wine and a wonderful dinner spiced with unique traditional customs.


More Info »
Pesach Seder
Thursday, Apr. 9, 2020 - 8:00 pm
Relive the exodus, discover the eternal meaning of the Haggadah, and enjoy a community Seder complete with hand-baked Shmurah Matzah, wine and a wonderful dinner spiced with unique traditional customs.


More Info »
 
 
 
Daily Thought
The Ark

There is a raging storm at sea. There are hellish waves crashing and pounding upon the shore, carrying all away, leaving desolation behind.

The sea is this world into which you were thrown. The waves are the stress and anxiety of indecision, not knowing which way to turn, on what to rely. Up and down, hot and cold—constantly churning back and forth.

Do as Noah did and build an ark. Ark in Hebrew is teivah—which means also “a word.” Your ark shall be the words of contemplation and of prayer.

Enter into your ark, and rather than drown you with everything else, let the waters carry you upward.

Maamar Mayim Rabim 5738.
 
Daily Quote
And they baked unleavened cakes of the dough which they brought out of Egypt, for it was not leavened; because they were driven out of Egypt, and could not delay, neither had they prepared for themselves any provision . . .
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
This Week @ www.ChabadNoVa.org
Your Questions
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All we know about her is her name. And that’s all we need to know.
By the Numbers
10 Classic Jewish Teachings About the Moon
 
Essay
On a Positive Note
Chapter 28 of Positivity Bias
Video
On the Battlefield
Ronnie Romberg and her husband, Dr. Henry Romberg, met at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio and were married in 1968. Having long dreamed of making Aliyah and moving to Israel, they had all their plans set. All until a Chabad friend of theirs convinced them to ask the Rebbe’s advice first. To make a long story short, they didn’t get the answer they were expecting.
Chabad-Lubavitch News from Around the World
Holiday Watch
Passover Seder-to-Go Kits Being Rushed to the Housebound
 
Education
Tens of Thousands of Kids Log on to New Hebrew School
 
Headquarters
Statement by Chabad-Lubavitch Headquarters
 
Roundup
Reaching Out to Seniors Isolated and Frightened by Coronavirus
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
The Jewish Calendar
  Thursday Adar 23 | March 19
  Friday Adar 24 | March 20
  Shabbat Adar 25 | March 21
  Sunday Adar 26 | March 22
  Monday Adar 27 | March 23
  Tuesday Adar 28 | March 24
  Wednesday Adar 29 | March 25
  Thursday Nissan 1 | March 26
  Friday Nissan 2 | March 27
  Shabbat Nissan 3 | March 28
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
 
The Parshah In A Nutshell

Parshat Vayak'hel-Pekudei

Moses assembles the people of Israel and reiterates to them the commandment to observe the Shabbat. He then conveys G‑d’s instructions regarding the making of the Mishkan (Tabernacle). The people donate the required materials in abundance, bringing gold, silver and copper; blue-, purple- and red-dyed wool; goat hair, spun linen, animal skins, wood, olive oil, herbs and precious stones. Moses has to tell them to stop giving.

A team of wise-hearted artisans make the Mishkan and its furnishings (as detailed in the previous Torah readings of Terumah, Tetzaveh and Ki Tisa): three layers of roof coverings; 48 gold-plated wall panels, and 100 silver foundation sockets; the parochet ( veil) that separates between the Sanctuary’s two chambers, and the masach ( screen) that fronts it; the Ark and its cover with the Cherubim; the table and its showbread; the seven-branched menorah with its specially prepared oil; the golden altar and the incense burned on it; the anointing oil; the outdoor altar for burnt offerings and all its implements; the hangings, posts and foundation sockets for the courtyard; and the basin and its pedestal, made out of copper mirrors.

An accounting is made of the gold, silver and copper donated by the people for the making of the Mishkan. Betzalel, Aholiav and their assistants make the eight priestly garments—the ephod, breastplate, cloak, crown, turban, tunic, sash and breeches—according to the specifications communicated to Moses in the Parshah of Tetzaveh.

The Mishkan is completed and all its components are brought to Moses, who erects it and anoints it with the holy anointing oil, and initiates Aaron and his four sons into the priesthood. A cloud appears over the Mishkan, signifying the divine presence that has come to dwell within it.


Parshat Hachodesh

This being the Shabbat that falls on or before the first of Nissan, we also read the section of Hachodesh (Exodus 12:1–20), which relates G‑d’s words to Moses in Egypt two weeks before the Exodus, instructing us to set the Jewish calendar by the monthly new moon, and to regard Nissan as the “head of months.” G‑d also instructs to bring the Passover offering, to eat it with matzah and bitter herbs, and to abstain from leaven for seven days.